Ecology of Research: Seeds of Time - Seed Journal

When you're a journalism student taking an art class so you just make newspaper art... Art imitates Life imitates Art.

When you're a journalism student taking an art class so you just make newspaper art... Art imitates Life imitates Art.

I carried a rolling pin around in my backpack for an entire semester of college. This is my story.

Whenever I look at this picture of myself, I can't help but think of that one meme.
*Record scratch*
*Freeze frame*
Yup. That's me. You're probably wondering how I got here. 

By here, I'm talking about the Gates of Heaven Chapel balcony using a rolling pin to print templates of a Seed Journal for visitors to document what their experience at the Ecology of Research: Seed of Time final art exhibition. There was square dancing, knot tying, water testing, carnival bartering, sailing, kayaking, sea shanty singing, scurvy punch drinking, fishnet finger weaving... and so much more.  

I became close with a chemistry student in the class who was equally mind-boggled by some aspects of our class. She decided to test the lake water. I decorated the jars with sea glass... that counts as art right?

I became close with a chemistry student in the class who was equally mind-boggled by some aspects of our class. She decided to test the lake water. I decorated the jars with sea glass... that counts as art right?

It's impossible to explain what a semester in Amy Franchesini's Ecology of Research: Seeds of Time artist-in-residence seminar was like in less than an hour, let alone a few hundred words. This is difficult for me to admit as a journalist. 

Every Friday for an hour and a half we would postulate, investigate, examine and fantasize about various complexities involving history, nature, art, consumption, ethics, storytelling, framing, perspective... I'm already getting carried away. I can't exactly tell you what this experience was, but I can tell you I walked away each week feeling inspired in every aspect of my work and life. This is not an exaggeration. 

I hope I can upload the journals people kept during the evening at some point. They were great sports.

Amy has a quote she said to a communications representative from UW-Madison for a news release: 

At the beginning of the class, students would ask, ‘When are we going to know exactly what we’re doing?’ And I was like, ‘Probably never.’
— Amy Franchesini

Couldn't have said it better. Take a look at the progress of her work here.

 

Rachael Lallensack